Thursday, August 4All That Matters

[OC] This massive cavity I had in a tooth removed an hr ago.


[OC] This massive cavity I had in a tooth removed an hr ago.



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35 Comments

  • Oliver10110

    I’ve got two teeth that have lost most of their enamel because of acid reflux and it hurts occasionally but that looks like a whole new level of pain and then relief once removed.

  • rpgmgta

    I had a filling in this tooth fall out a few months ago and until today I thought the cavity was just the empty space from the missing filling. Turns out I was very wrong. I touched a nerve last night while eating chicken wings and again this morning with breakfast and knew something was very wrong.

    Update: [They let me keep it/them](https://imgur.com/a/foBgeuc)

  • thefoodiedentist

    Fillings only last 5-10 yrs at best before they start leaking and you get cavity around it. Your cavity got so big that filling fell out from loss of retention. Over half of that tooth is basically mush/hollow. You can tell by the discoloration of enamel.

    Needed fixing 10 years ago. Filling is prolly like 20+ yrs old. Bummer u pulled that tooth, it does 90% of chewing and chewing on that side won’t be same anymore.

  • Mordercalynn

    I am currently waiting on getting stuff fixed. I’ve only been to the dentist twice in my life, and got a quote of 6k :/ now to pick and choose what teeth hurt the worst.

  • ___LOOPDAED___

    Just had the same thing done 3 weeks ago. The tooth originally had a root canal and after 10 years the silver cap or whatever feel off to reveal what I could only describe as a corrupted tooth.

    The dentist spent 2hrs yanking it out and twisting. Was a scary experience.

  • henrxv

    Oh shit! I think my wisdom tooth had one of similar size. It was crazy cus no one could see it and since it took like 2 years to touch the nerve not even the dentist believed me. Last 3 days before removal I could barely sleep. After the removal my GF was like “sorry I didn’t believe it was that big”, even tho I told everyone it was like half the teeth size lmao good riddance

  • MavriKhakiss

    I had a teeth like that fall piece by piece on its own, until nothing remained, and no pain at all in the process. I got the whole thing removed several weeks later. How is that possible?

  • WanderingQuills

    Sigh. I see so many “I didn’t have insurance for x years so same same” and I just
    Sigh
    I started off British and so poor it was fortune they helped me at all.
    This just makes me want to hug op and make soup for all of us not really feeling biting hard things.
    By the time I had “decent” insurance my mouth was so bad it was scary to see the bill OR get it done
    Feel better OP

  • wrestlingchampo

    I want to inform people based off of this thread that it is almost as important from a chemistry standpoint to refrain from consuming ANYTHING (water included) for a half hour after you brush your teeth.

    When you brush your teeth [with fluoridated toothpaste, not Tom’s of Maine/Charcoal BS], you are stimulating a chemical reaction to occur between the enamel on the exterior of your teeth, and the fluoride in your toothpaste. Your teeth are made of a matrix of phosphate, calcium, and a compound called hydroxyapatite. When acidic conditions emerge on the surface of your teeth, phosphate and calcium leech out from tooth enamel to re-balance the pH in a process called demineralization. Fluoride replaces the -OH group in Hydroxyapatite to form Fluorapatite. The Fluorapatite that replaces hydroxyapatite is much more resistant to acid erosion and demineralization, thereby retaining more of the phosphate and calcium that would normally be lost.

    The issue is that this replacement of hydroxyl groups by fluoride ions takes time to form the proper chemical bonds. Without the proper time and environment in the mouth, the necessary chemistry may not take place and that fluoride toothpaste you bought is not much more effective than rubbing sand on your teeth and gums.

    ​

    Note: Not a dentist, but rather a chemist and biochemistry enthusiast.

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